Rucktionary

802.11ac vs. 802.11n

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

802.11 is a family of wireless standards created by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). 802.11n is the older version of Wi-Fi, launched in 2009. It improved over previous versions of Wi-Fi with multiple radios, advanced transmit and receive techniques, and the option to use 5 GHz spectrum—all of which translate to a data rate of up to 600 Mbps.

802.11ac, introduced in 2014, is the latest generation. It adds wider channels and the ability to utilize up to eight data streams (“spatial streams”) with downlink using multi-user multiple input, multiple output (MU-MIMO) techniques for simultaneous transmission on up to four devices. These are changes over the previous standard that yield a maximum data rate of more than 3 Gbps, and even higher in the future. It also operates exclusively in the cleaner, capacity-rich 5 GHz frequency band.

Why you should care:

Older 802.11n technology is now widely deployed, and still does a good job for many applications. But if you’re deploying wireless infrastructure today, especially in a new, “green field” deployment, 802.11ac is the way to go. You might have heard some grumbling about real-world 802.11ac throughput gains not living up to expectations. And that was sometimes true for early products. But the second generation of 802.11ac—known as “Wave 2”—delivers major advantages over 802.11n, with room to grow. To get the most from 802.11ac, however, you need solutions built with solid wireless fundamentals, thoughtful radio design and very good antennas.

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802.11ac Wave 2

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

802.11ac Wave 2 is the newest version of the newest Wi-Fi standard. It builds on first-generation 802.11ac technology by delivering faster data rates and the ability to communicate with four different clients simultaneously, instead of one at a time.

Why you should care:

Since rolling out in 2015, 802.11ac Wave 2 has become the Wi-Fi technology of choice, seeing double-digit growth in its first two years after launch. With wireless speeds as fast or faster than wired networks, many businesses now use it as the primary way to connect to the LAN.

Ruckus got in early on the 802.11ac game, offering one of the leading Wave 2 access points and the industry’s first commercially available Wave 2 outdoor access point. Today, we offer one of the largest Wave 2 portfolios on the market. By combining Wave 2 capacity with our technology breakthroughs in Smart Wi-Fi intelligence and antenna design, we’re making the dream of super-fast 802.11ac a reality in thousands of locations worldwide.

802.11ax 

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

802.11ax, is the latest Wi-Fi IEEE wireless standard. This new standard brings significant advances on multiple fronts.  It expands the multiple input, multiple output (MU-MIMO) techniques to transmit simultaneously on up to eight streams compared to four streams on 802.11ac Wave 2. Furthermore, it piggybacks on MU-MIMO with Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) technology allowing each MU-MIMO stream to be split into four additional streams, boosting effective average throughput per user by four times.

Introduction of new modulation and coding sets with 1024-QAM allows for more data to be transmitted per packet resulting in better throughput. It also improved the overall physical and MAC layer efficiency and improves the battery power management.

If earlier standard was like a long line of customers waiting in a grocery store for one cashier, MU-MIMO expanded it to four cashiers serving four lines of customers in 802.11ac. 802.11ax expanded it further to eight cashiers serving eight lines of customers. With OFDMA, now the cashier gets the ability to handle multiple customers at a time when they are free. Imagine, a cashier being able to serve the next customer, if the first customer decides to do a quick run back to pick something up.

Why you should care:

Wi-Fi is now being deployed at crowded stadiums or busy airports with hundreds of thousands of devices fighting for bandwidth which the current 802.11ac standard has challenges in supporting. 802.11ax increase the average throughput per user by 4x in high-density scenarios.

The newest standard combined with Ruckus’ Ultra-High-Density Technology Suite will empower you to deliver the best end-user experience.

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Airtime Decongestion

Performance Optimization

What it means:

APs and Clients continuously exchange management frames to maintain a connection. Airtime Decongestion is a Ruckus technology that limits management frame exchanges between APs and clients in ultra-high dense environments.

Why you should care:

In an ultra-high dense Wi-Fi environment, excessive management traffic saturates the available Wi-Fi spectrum. This results in poor connectivity and low per-client throughput, ultimately leading to a poor client experience.

Airtime Decongestion technology enables APs to selectively respond to clients, dramatically increasing overall network efficiency for higher airtime utilization and thus a better user experience.

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Airtime Fairness

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Airtime fairness is a feature on Ruckus APs that ensures all connected clients get the same amount of airtime, regardless of each device’s theoretical data rate.

Why you should care:

Ever been in a conference room and noticed your wireless device isn’t performing as it should? This happens in mixed environments where some devices are using older wireless technologies, or when some clients are much farther away than others. Like a teacher doling out snacks, access points share their capacity equally, giving each device its turn to download the same number of packets. If your colleague’s ancient laptop, or a tablet connected down the hall, takes a lot longer to download them, you’ll feel that delay—and so will everyone else connected to that AP. Instead, airtime fairness gives every device the same transmission time, no matter how many packets they receive. So older or more distant clients don’t slow everyone else down, and your network gains capacity.

Asset Tracking

Location and Analytics

What it means:

Asset Tracking is a way to keep track of a device’s location using Wi-Fi, radio frequency ID (RFID) tags, or a combination of both.

Why you should care:

Many organizations—especially schools, hospitals, and others with large campuses—have lots of expensive equipment that moves around all the time. Whether it’s tablets or laptops used by students and teachers, audiovisual equipment, lab or clinical equipment, organizations want to be able to know where their assets are located. Modern wireless technologies offer two ways to do this. For devices connected to the Wi-Fi network, you can use Wi-Fi location and positioning tools to see their location. For assets with an RFID tag attached, you can use similar tools that use Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons to track them. If you’re using a Ruckus Smart Positioning Technology (SPoT), you can do both. Just open up the Locator feature in the SPoT Analytics Dashboard, enter in the device’s unique MAC address, and you can:

  • Instantly pinpoint any device’s real-time location
  • View historical heat maps of where devices have been and how long they spent there
  • Configure alerts for when devices enter or leave a location to reduce theft and loss
  • Support location-based advertising, navigation, and other services
  • Better identify users’ locations during an emergency

Band Steering

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Band steering is a technology that encourages WLAN clients to connect over one frequency band versus another.

Why you should care:

Most modern wireless networks can use both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. But 2.4 GHz is much more congested—both with older wireless clients, and things like cordless phones and Bluetooth devices that generate interference. For devices with “dual-band” capability, connecting over 5 GHz is usually the better choice.

With band steering, the wireless system monitors all clients in the environment, keeping track of whether they’re single-band or dual-band, and which types of APs are in their proximity. When a dual-band device tries to connect over 2.4 GHz, the AP steers it towards the cleaner, higher-capacity 5 GHz frequency band instead. Users on the 2.4 GHz band win too, because they’re now sharing that spectrum with fewer devices.

BeamFlex Adaptive Antenna Technology

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Smart, compact adaptive antenna systems containing multiple elements that electrically manipulate antenna properties so as to create optimal antenna patterns for each device with which they communicate.

Why you should care:

Traditional wireless antennas are either “omnidirectional” (radiating signals in all directions) or “directional” (radiating signals in one direction). Ruckus BeamFlex Adaptive Antenna Technology takes a more adaptable approach. BeamFlex technology enables the antenna system within a Ruckus AP to continually sense and optimize for its environment.

This antenna system mitigates radio interference, noise and network performance issues, and improves application flows. The results:

  • Increased performance and range
  • Crystal clear video and voice communications
  • Maximized power efficiency

BeamFlex+ is an enhancement to Ruckus BeamFlex adaptive antenna technology by providing adaptive support to mobile devices. BeamFlex+ enables antennas to adapt to client device orientation in addition to client device location.

Beamforming

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Beamforming is a technique APs use to focus their radio signals in the direction of the clients they’re communicating with to gain better capacity and throughput. And while “beamforming” and Ruckus’ “Beamflex” technology sound similar, they’re not the same thing!

When most technology vendors talk about beamforming, they mean “transmit beamforming,” (TxBF), which is achieved through signal processing built into the AP’s chip. In contrast, Ruckus’ Beamflex+ technology focuses radio signals using smart adaptive antennas. Beamflex+ is not part of the industry-standard chip. We add this capability—which works at the antenna-level—and we’re the only vendor that has successfully implemented it.

Why you should care:

When APs target their signals directly to clients, the signal is stronger (better throughput), and the overall airspace is cleaner (less interference from signals bouncing all over the place). So we can all agree that beamforming is a good thing. But some vendors claim TxBF is all you need. That’s not quite true.

Transmit beamforming requires feedback from the client—which means devices have to support the TxBF protocol to benefit from it, and many don’t. Transmitters using TxBF also can’t use spatial multiplexing at the same time (another technique that’s widely used to get more capacity in the same airspace).

With Ruckus’ revolutionary BeamFlex and BeamFlex+ Adaptive Antenna technology, you can provide benefits for all clients. So your RF spectrum stays much cleaner, and your network delivers better throughput and reliability. Want to use both? You can: BeamFlex and BeamFlex+ technologies add benefit on top of whatever beamforming technology may be implemented in the chip.

Campus Fabric Technology

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Based on open standard IEEE 802.1BR Bridge Port Extension technology, Ruckus Campus Fabric integrates premium, mid-range, and entry-level switches by collapsing the network access, aggregation, and core layers into a single domain that shares services.

The control bridge and a port extender are the building blocks of a Campus Fabric. The traditional aggregation/core layer is replaced by switches that act as the control bridge which is the brain of the complete Campus Fabric technology. The access layer is replaced by switches that operate in port extender mode; these switches provide connectivity to PCs, laptops, IP phones, and other access devices. The control bridge communicates with the attached port extender devices using protocols defined in the IEEE 802.1BR standards.

Why you should care:

Traditional access networks are highly inefficient and rigid, requiring network teams to connect to each individual network devices to provision resources, apply configuration changes, and deploy network policies.

Unlike the traditional three-tier network design, Ruckus Campus Fabric collapses the network into a single logical device. This design centralizes control, simplifies deployment and management of services, and scales easily to handle growth. All the links between the switches are active at all times and traffic is load balanced. The results are:

  • Optimized performance
  • Increased resiliency
  • Faster network service deployment

Campus Fabric: 2-Minute Explainer

Certificate Management

Wired and Wireless Network Security

What it means:

In computer networking, a digital certificate is a document installed on a device that provides the basis for authenticating the device onto the network. Certificate management is the process of managing these digital certificates. This includes processes such as creation, storage, distribution, suspension and revocation. Certificate authorities (CA) are responsible for certificate management and serve as a registration authority for subscriber certificates.

Why you should care:

Digital certificates installed on the device as part of an automated network onboarding process streamline network authentication and make sure that every connection is secure. Users who have installed a certificate on their device during initial onboarding no longer have to take any action to re-authenticate on future connection attempts—the device connects automatically in a process that is transparent to the user. The certificate persists on the device until revoked by IT administrators. Default methods of network onboarding and authentication, such as conventional pre-shared keys and MAC authentication, do not provide the security or user experience benefits of digital certificates distributed via a secure onboarding platform.

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ChannelFly Advanced Channel Selection

Performance Optimization

What it means:

The ChannelFly dynamic channel management technology in Ruckus APs improves wireless performance by dynamically switching a client to a better channel when the one it’s using starts to degrade.

Why you should care:

Most modern WLAN products can change a client’s channel when the one it’s using gets clogged with interference or too many devices. But there’s no point in switching channels unless you know the new one will actually provide more capacity. And most channel management strategies don’t do a great job of predicting. ChannelFly technology assesses all available channels to measure the real-world capacity improvement each one can provide before it directs the AP to switch channels.

ChannelFly technology was originally developed for use in carrier Wi-Fi environments, where channels are highly congested. Even in these dense public settings, it delivers multi-fold improvements in AP and network capacity—within seconds, automatically.

Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS)

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

In 2015, FCC authorized the use of the 3.5 GHz band (3550 MHz to 3700 MHz) for shared wireless access, opening up spectrum currently used by the US Navy and other DoD members.

The band utilizes standard LTE (in band 48) but it’s unique in how spectrum is allocated: Usage is individually requested and assigned on a case-by-case basis. When the use of the spectrum is no longer required, the specific channel is freed up and made available to other users.

To use CBRS spectrum, one must request and be assigned a band by a Spectrum Allocation Server (SAS). The SAS calculates RF density and channel availability using terrain, radio propagation and current usage data before approving the request and allocating the spectrum.

Why should you care?

Shared spectrum with CBRS is a game changer in wireless connectivity in the US. It will enable simply better wireless experiences.

Who is this for? Basically everyone (in the US).

Mobile operators will leverage this band to augment their existing mobile coverage.

Cable operators will be able to utilize this spectrum in their new wireless offerings.

Organizations in the U.S. will, for the first time, be able to build their own LTE networks to address their most challenging business-critical use cases with CBRS.

Once CBRS supported mobile phones will be prevalent venues will be able to deploy neutral host networks. A single CBRS small cell will be able to provide cellular coverage to multiple operators. This could address in-building coverage issues with a very cost effective and straightforward solution.

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Client Load Balancing

Performance Optimization

What it means:

With client load balancing, a WLAN distributes new connections across multiple APs in order to make the best use of the network and radio spectrum.

Why you should care:

When too many clients connect to a single AP, there’s less capacity available for each device, and poorer performance. But in many environments, a client can connect to any of several APs. Ruckus APs and ZoneDirector software track every client in the environment and distribute connections more evenly, while making sure that each device has a strong signal. So your WLANs make better use of their capacity, and users get better throughput and quality.

Client Roaming and SmartRoam+

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Client roaming allows wireless devices to switch from one AP to another more quickly and intelligently as they move through a space. This is especially important for latency- and quality-of-service (QoS)-sensitive applications like voice and video, where sticking too long with an AP as you move away from it will degrade performance.

Why you should care:

If you’re using a mobile device, you’re likely to be, well, mobile. Which means your experience will suffer if your device doesn’t know when to switch from the AP you connected with when you walked in the door to the one across the convention hall where you are now. Unfortunately, many devices get “stuck” to their previous AP for too long. This is especially problematic for voice and video applications, and a major source of frustration in high-density environments.

With Ruckus SmartRoam+ technology, you can force clients to switch to a new AP when their signal gets too weak. Your users get better roaming. And, even more important in dense public venues, you won’t waste network capacity communicating with too many devices over slower, weaker connections.

Dynamic Pre-shared Key (DPSK)

Wired and Wireless Network Security

What it means:

Dynamic Pre-Shared Key (DPSK) is a Ruckus-patented technology that delivers secure network access by providing each device and user with a unique login credential. Users access the wired/wireless network using their own personal key, which is provided as part of the network onboarding process. In contrast, with conventional pre-shared keys (PSKs), multiple, or even all, users share the same key.

Why you should care:

Traditional pre-shared keys create a security hole in network defenses because multiple users access the network with the same key. Conventional PSKs do not give IT teams visibility and control over devices on the network or the ability to map access policies to specific users and devices. Users readily share conventional PSKs with others, and IT cannot revoke them for one user without revoking access for all. DPSKs address the security flaws of conventional PSKs to make users, devices, data and the network more secure.

DPSKs are an alternative to digital certificates that provide similar security benefits. They are appropriate in cases where user experience considerations make it impractical to install a digital certificate on the device. This applies in cases where the user will only need network access for a limited time—for example, in the case of guest users.

Footfall Analytics

Location and Analytics

What it means:

Footfall analytics is a way to use the wireless network in a public venue (especially a retail store) to gain deep insight into how customers behave in a physical space.

Why you should care:

While online is a big part of modern retail business, physical stores still play a huge role in the shopping experience. Now, retailers around the world are using location analytics to bring the same kind of personalized, highly targeted shopping intelligence you see online to their brick-and-mortar stores. Location analytics solutions like Ruckus Smart Positioning Technology (SPoT) can show retailers exactly how customers are using a space. They can see in-store traffic patterns, identify the best locations for products down to the shelf level, optimize store layouts to increase sales and time spent in the venue, and much more.

Hotspot 2.0

Wired and Wireless Network Security

What it means:

Hotspot 2.0 makes Wi-Fi roaming as seamless as cell phone roaming. Just as your cell phone automatically finds a roaming partner network and securely connects no matter where you travel, users can get the same experience over Wi-Fi.

Why you should care:

Most wireless users prefer to connect to Wi-Fi whenever they can, either to avoid cellular data overages, or because they’re using a Wi-Fi-only device. But they have to work for it—finding and selecting the right network, entering a password, logging on through a portal. With Hotspot 2.0 and the 802.11u standard, all that goes away. Here’s how it works:

Wireless providers—cable or mobile providers, enterprises, and others—join roaming partnerships with other providers. Users’ devices are loaded with the right credentials and security certificates. Then, anytime a user is away from her home network provider, her device automatically checks for Hotspot 2.0-capable APs with participating roaming partners. If one is available, she can connect automatically, without doing a thing.

Internet of Things (IoT)

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

The Internet of things (IoT) refer to common physical devices – such as an electric bulb, lock, washing machine or even an automobile augmented with software and internet connectivity.

Why you should care:

The direct benefit is the ability to monitor and control these IoT devices from anywhere in the world. IoT devices can collect data, which can be used to enhance user experiences, improve organizational efficiency or reduce organizational costs. IoT can also enable organizations to offer new services along with their existing products.

For instance, smart locks can enhance the security for a home owner or a guest at a hotel. Intelligent lighting controls can reduce energy usage. Additionally, connected trash cans can inform a waste management company when it is full and thus require a collection process.

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Internet-of-Things (IoT) Access Network

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

An IoT access network connects both WiFi and non-WiFi IoT endpoints over a converged, multi-standard, physical network. 

Why you should care:

An An IoT access network connects both Wi-Fi and non-Wi-Fi IoT endpoints over a converged, multi-standards physical network. Such a network unifies and reuses the same device onboarding, security and management infrastructure of an existing wired and wireless network to reduce costs thus enabling organizations to more quickly realize benefits from IoT endpoints and services.

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Mesh Networking and SmartMesh

Performance Optimization

What it means:

You’re not crazy if you think that wireless networks should be… wireless. But in traditional WLANs, you still have to run cables to each AP. In mesh networks, individual APs connect with each other wirelessly.

Why you should care:

Who wouldn’t want to eliminate the need for expensive Ethernet cabling across their facilities? But making mesh networks work in enterprises is easier said than done. Traditionally, it’s required a lot of complex configuration, and it’s been hard to assure consistent, reliable connectivity.

With Ruckus SmartMesh Networking technology, we’ve made mesh networks enterprise-grade. Instead of navigating complex configurations for each AP, just check a box. The mesh forms automatically. And with our BeamFlex technology, APs can dynamically change antenna patterns on a packet-by-packet basis to adapt to conditions and ensure a solid connection. Enterprises get self-forming, self-healing mesh networks at half the time and cost of traditional wireless deployments.

Multi-gigabit Technology

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

Multi-gigabit technology and specifically the IEEE 802.3bz standard, formally introduced as 2.5GBASE-T and 5GBASE-T in 2016. IEEE 802.3bz is a standard for Ethernet over twisted pair copper wire at speeds of 2.5 Gbps and 5 Gbps.

Why you should care:

Gigabit connections have served us well for many years, delivering fast low-latency data to laptops, smartphones and other devices. However, the latest generation of APs can overwhelm a 1 GbE connection so that the wired network becomes a performance bottleneck. Multi-gigabit technology, which operate above 1 Gbps supports new data rates of 2.5 and 5 Gbps, while still leveraging commonly deployed Cat 5e (for 2.5 Gbps) or Cat 6 (for 5 Gbps) cabling. Thus, enterprises can maximize the performance of their Wi-Fi networks in the most cost-effective, least-disruptive manner. The Ruckus ICX Z-series switches and the Ruckus R720 access point support multi-gigabit technology / 802.3bz to help organizations maximize their Wi-Fi network performance.

Network Capacity Utilization

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Network Capacity Utilization improves overall network capacity and airtime utilization with built-in adaptive client management techniques that evenly spread client load across APs and across bands to maintain optimal AP-to-client links in ultra-high dense environments.

Why you should care:

In dense networks, APs end up with uneven client load leading to inefficient utilization of overall network capacity. This leads to a sub-optimal client-to-AP link quality resulting in a lower throughput for the clients.

Network Capacity Utilization employs real-time learning techniques to associate clients to APs with higher link quality and capacity in response to dynamic network loads resulting in higher overall network capacity and higher per-client throughput and a better user experience.

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Network Controller

General Networking Technologies

What it means:

In Ruckus Networks terminology, a SmartZone™ network controller is a physical or virtual network element used to monitor, manage and control Ruckus access points (APs) and Ruckus switches. When updated to the SmartZoneOS 5.0 release, all SmartZone WLAN controllers, e.g. SmartZone 100, Virtual SmartZone – Essentials, become SmartZone network controllers.

Why you should care:

Within the networking industry, managing a network of both APs and switches (“unified management”) has traditionally required the use of a separate network management system above and beyond the WLAN controller. A separate management system demands, at minimum, a separate software license and the need for IT staff to be trained on two different systems. The result: excess time spent, excess cost and complexity.

A simpler approach to managing the network now exists. Ruckus SmartZone network controllers are the first appliances in the industry that allow IT to manage both the LAN and the WLAN using a single, controller-managed system with a single user interface. This approach simplifies a wide range of IT activities, enabling, for example, a single automated discovery process for both switches and APs and the easy creation of common access policies across switches and APs.

OpenFlow Hybrid Port Mode

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Ruckus OpenFlow hybrid port mode allows users to enable OpenFlow on any desired port on the Ruckus ICX switch while supporting other traditional switching features concurrently without increasing latency.

Why you should care:

Customers want to be able to create an OpenFlow overlay on top of existing production networks. The OpenFlow overlay would be used to support new premium services and SDN applications on top of the underlay network. With Ruckus hybrid port mode, a separate network is not needed to realize the benefits of SDN and OpenFlow.

Ports on Demand

Performance Optimization

What it means:

The Ruckus ICX 7250 Switch has 8 ports that can be upgraded to 10 Gbps port speed with one or more Ports on Demand (PoD) licenses.

Why you should care:

Flexible licensing of 1 GbE to 10 GbE ports, for uplink or stacking, allows organizations to optimize network performance based on specific requirements by simply applying a software license. This eliminates the need to install a separate hardware module and makes network or infrastructure upgrade easier. The results are:

  • Faster response to network changes and needs
  • Cost-effective use of Ruckus switches
  • Stronger investment protection as performance/capacity needs expand

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Secure Guest Access

Wired and Wireless Network Security

What it means:

Visitors to any environment—schools, colleges, government agencies, retail, hospitality, offices or practically anywhere—arrive expecting easy and secure connectivity for their devices. Secure guest access means allowing visitors (vendors, partners, consultants—visitors of any kind) a way to securely access the internet and/or local network resources services over the wireless or wired network.

Why you should care:

When done right, guest access is a win for both the end-user and the organization providing it. Guest users are more productive when they can get online quickly and easily. Internet connectivity helps the visitor conduct whatever business or activity brings them to your environment, which also benefits the organization. Modern guest access systems let visitors securely self-provision their devices for internet access without IT involvement, avoiding costly and labor-intensive help desk tickets. These systems let IT teams customize network onboarding workflows, which may be sponsor-initiated, sponsor-approved, or entirely self-service. Guests receive their individual login credentials via SMS, email or printed vouchers.

IT teams can customize the onboarding portal so that the look and feel supports the organization’s brand. They can grant access for a specified period depending upon how long the user will remain on site. Guest users typically get internet access only—they don’t see internal network resources. IT gains visibility and control over devices on the network, with the ability to revoke access at any time. An up-front security posture check with remediation further enhances security. 

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Secure Network Onboarding

Wired and Wireless Network Security

What it means:

Network onboarding is the process by which a BYOD, guest or IT-owned device gains access to the network for the first time. Secure network onboarding means doing this in a way that enhances security for users, devices, data, and the network.

Why you should care:

BYOD and guest users often incur frustration with default methods for network onboarding. Default methods such as MAC authentications and conventional PSKs are not intuitive for users, leading to numerous help desk tickets. Default methods of onboarding and authentication are also not secure. An effective system for secure network onboarding improves end-user experience for BYOD users and guests. It relieves IT of the burden of excessive help desk tickets related to network access, and improves IT security as part of a layered protection strategy. Ruckus offers Cloudpath Enrollment System software/SaaS for this purpose.

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sFlow

Location and Analytics

What it means:

sFlow is a standards-based packet sampling technology embedded into the Ruckus ICX Switches to provide network managers a scalable technique for measuring network traffic, collecting, storing, and analyzing traffic data. This enables tens of thousands of interfaces to be monitored from a single location.

Why you should care:

With increasing reliance on network services for business critical operations, any change in the network can impact the network performance and reliability. If sFlow is configured on various links, sFlow helps to:

  • Analyze traffic statistics and trends on those links
  • Overcome unexpected network congestion
  • Improve capacity planning

SmartCast

Performance Optimization

What it means:

SmartCast is a sophisticated quality of service (QoS) engine specifically developed to maximize the reliability and performance of delay-sensitive applications, such as IP-based voice and video over 802.11 networks. Based on patented technology, SmartCast delivers a collection of unique capabilities — such as packet inspection, automatic traffic classification, advanced queuing and scheduling.

Why you should care:

With per-client queuing, SmartCast is ideal for video and voice over Wi-Fi applications because it ensures disruptive clients don’t negatively effect the performance of others clients on the network (no head-of-line blocking).

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Transient Client Management

Performance Optimization

What it means:

Transient Client Management is a capability that delays associations of Ruckus AP’s with transient clients (devices that are in the AP’s coverage area for a short time) using statistical methods.

Why you should care:

In a dense Wi-Fi network, transient clients can degrade the user experience for already connected clients. This problem is typical in train stations, bus terminals and various public hot spot venues where thousands of devices moving through an area send management frames to an AP they don’t intend to connect with. This overwhelms the network with unnecessary traffic and thus slows down the Wi-Fi.

With Transient Client Management, Ruckus APs maximize the attention towards already connected non-transient clients and utilize the airtime more efficiently.

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Ultra-High Density Technology Suite

Performance Optimization

What it means:

The Ruckus Ultra-High-Density Technology Suite is a collection of features and technologies designed to improve network performance and end-user experience in ultra-high dense environments – specifically stadiums, auditoriums, convention centres, transit hubs and lecture halls.

It comprises Ruckus unique technologies:

Why you should care:

There exists an insatiable demand for faster and better Wi-Fi driven by the growth in more devices and more demanding applications. This demand exists whether we are at the office or in a densely populated area such as at an airport or a train station.

While the latest Wi-Fi standards like 802.11ax deliver more, by itself that is not enough. Ruckus’ unique technologies combined with the new standard 802.11ax enable our customers to deliver the best end-user experience in ultra-high dense environments.

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VXLAN

Management Simplification

What it means:

Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) is a standard based encapsulation protocol that enables running an overlay network on the top of an existing physical network. An overlay network is a virtual network that delivers L2 services on the top of an exiting L3 network infrastructure creating new virtual L2 broadcast domains decoupled from the underlay network physical topology.

Why you should care:

VXLAN makes it easier for network engineers to bridge network segments across physical locations separated by L3 boundaries. It also facilitates traffic isolation between various applications and various classes of users or tenants, promoting security and privacy. VXLAN deployed on campus networks can speed up new location onboarding and reduces complexity when deploying new applications and network services across the campus.

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